Sunday, 15 September 2019

Gum Pain Causes, Relief and Treatments

What Causes Painful Gums?

If you experience painful gums when you eat, drink, brush, or floss, you may be wondering what’s causing it and how you can treat it. Painful or bleeding gums can be caused by improper brushing or flossing techniques, gum disease, chemotherapy, tobacco use, or certain hormonal changes. It is very common for gum disease to lead to pain and bleeding, so resolving the problem is an important part of keeping your gums healthy. Your gums provide the overall support for your teeth and the basis of a healthy mouth, and if not properly cared for, early gum disease can progress to other serious oral health problems.
Below are several different causes of gum pain. Being familiar with these causes of gum pain can help you talk to your dental or medical professional when they’re diagnosing the cause of your discomfort.
  • Canker Sores: These are painful ulcers found in your mouth that can cause serious gum pain. Canker sores can be caused by stress or injury to the tissue in your mouth, or an underlying health condition such as an impaired immune system, nutritional deficiencies, or gastrointestinal disease.
  • Cuts or Abrasions: Gum pain can often be caused by a simple cut or abrasion. Braces or other dental hardware such as dentures or retainers can irritate the tissue and cause gum pain.
  • Gum Disease or Infection: Gum pain associated with sensitive or bleeding gums is often caused by gum disease or gum infection. The mildest form of gum disease, gingivitis, affects approximately one in two American adults and can cause chronic gum pain and sensitivity. If not treated properly by removing plaque from the teeth and around the gum line, gingivitis can progress to more serious gum infection.
  • Sinus Infection: A sinus infection, otherwise known as sinusitis, occurs when the tissue lining of your sinuses is swollen or inflamed, and can lead to sinus gum pain. Sinuses are normally filled with air, but when they become filled with fluid, germs can grow and lead to infection. Approximately 37 million Americans suffer from sinusitis each year, so sinus gum pain and dental pain are very common. 
If you notice any of these symptoms along with gum pain, you may want to consult with a medical professional to confirm the diagnosis and get treatment recommendations. Regardless of where your gum pain is located or its cause, chances are you’ll want to address it quickly.

Gum Pain Relief and Treatments

Gum pain can manifest in different ways. Some people experience gum pain in a single area of the gums, while others suffer from gum pain throughout their mouths. If you don’t take good care of your gums, they can deteriorate, become inflamed, infected, cut or even suffer from disease.
While there are many causes for tooth and gum pain, the treatment for most causes is pretty standard. Implementing an effective oral hygiene routine will most often help improve the health of your gums. 

A few gum pain remedies include: 
Other ways to reduce gum pain may include avoiding the use of tobacco, improving your nutrition, or reducing stress in your life. These important steps combined with an effective oral hygiene regimen can help bring your gums back to good health.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 

Friday, 6 September 2019

Dental Grills — The New Trend Affecting Dentistry And The Health Of Your Teeth

It’s the latest trend in dental wear, but there’s nothing cool about the damage it could do to your smile. Dental Grills are a cosmetic, metal and sometimes jeweled tooth covering developed in the early 1980s by hip hop artists. Grills, also called fronts, are removable and fit over the front teeth. Dental grills are made of gold, silver or jewel encrusted metals that run as little as $20 and well into the thousands for more elaborate designs.
Can Wearing a Dental Grill create Oral Health Problems? 
Yes, they can. It’s important to conduct thorough oral hygiene procedures including flossing and brushing with an anti-microbial toothpaste as food and plaque can easily develop on the grill and can cause irritation to the gingival margin and gingivitis may develop and the possibility of tooth decay. Dental grills can also cause abrasion to adjoining teeth, gum recession, tooth discoloration or chipped teeth. A grill should always be removed before eating or rinsing to clean the mouth, and may cause an allergic reaction to the metal.
School districts in Alabama, Georgia, and Texas have banned grills from their use due to disciplinary and health related reasons1. It is important to consult with a dentist regarding the steps for dental grill placement and the implications on your oral health.
Who Makes the Dental Grill? 
A dentist should make a dental grill by taking a proper impression of the teeth versus a jeweler or a grill vendor. A non-licensed dental professional could cause worse dental and oral health problems.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com
Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 

Saturday, 24 August 2019

Aging and Dental Health

As you age, it becomes even more important to take good care of your teeth and dental health. One common misconception is that losing your teeth is inevitable. This is not true. If cared for properly, your teeth can last a lifetime.
Your mouth changes as you age. The nerves in your teeth can become smaller, making your teeth less sensitive to cavities or other problems. If you don’t get regular dental exams, this in turn can lead to these problems not being diagnosed until it is too late. 
If you want to feel good, stay healthy, and look great throughout life, you might be surprised what a difference a healthy mouth makes.

Tips for Maintaining and Improving Your Oral Health

  • Brush twice a day with a toothbrush with soft bristles. You may also benefit from using an electric toothbrush.
  • Clean between your teeth once a day with floss or another flossing tool.
  • If you wear full or partial dentures, remember to clean them on a daily basis. Take your dentures out of your mouth for at least four hours every day. It’s best to remove them at night. 
  • Drink tap water. Since most contains fluoride, it helps prevent tooth decay no matter how old you are.
  • Quit smoking. Besides putting you at greater risk for lung and other cancers, smoking increases problems with gum disease, tooth decay and tooth loss.
  • Visit your dentist. Visit your dentist regularly for a complete dental check-up. 
By adopting healthy oral habits at home, making smart choices about diet and lifestyle, and seeking regular dental care, you can help your teeth last a lifetime—whether you have your natural teeth, implants or wear dentures. 

Caregiving for a Disabled or Elderly Loved One  

You may have a parent, spouse or friend who has difficulty maintaining a healthy mouth on their own. How can you help? Two things are critical:
  • Help them keep their mouth clean with reminders to brush and floss daily. 
  • Make sure they get to a dentist regularly. 
These steps can prevent many problems, but tasks that once seemed so simple can become very challenging. If your loved one is having difficulty with brushing and flossing, talk to a dentist or hygienist who can provide helpful tips or a different approach. There are dentists who specialize in caring for the elderly and disabled. You can locate a specialist through the Special Care Dentistry Association’s referral directory. For those who wear dentures, pay close attention to their eating habits. If they’re having difficulty eating or are not eating as much as usual, denture problems could be the cause.
When you’re caring for someone who is confined to bed, they may have so many health problems that it’s easy to forget about oral health. However, it’s still very important because bacteria from the mouth can be inhaled into the lungs and cause pneumonia.
If you are a representative for a nursing home resident who needs dental care and is enrolled in Medicaid, there is a regulation, called an Incurred Medical Expense, that may help pay for medically necessary care as determined by a dentist. The Medicaid caseworker at the nursing facility and the dentist providing care can work together to apply the Incurred Medical Expense to pay for needed dental benefits.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org
Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 


Thursday, 15 August 2019

Teaching Teens Proper Oral Hygiene

When your teen is already busy with friends, schoolwork and catching up on sleep, proper oral hygiene can go on the back burner. When running late for school, sometimes there just isn't time for a full two minutes of toothbrushing. But as a parent, it's up to you to make sure that your teen practices good dental care. By making oral hygiene part of a simple daily routine, you can help your teen sneak in regular brushing and flossing along with all the other plans in his or her schedule.
Use Teen-Based Products
One of the reasons teens might be slacking in the dental care department is the fact that most oral hygiene products aren't exactly tailored to adolescent tastes. Strong flavors and boring designs could make teens less than enthused when it comes to daily care. That's where youth-geared products can really come in handy. By appealing to teens' tastes and style, it's easier to coax them into a daily care routine. Check out the Colgate®Fresh Confidence product line, designed with adolescents in mind.
Try Apps and Timers
One of the biggest issues for teens and proper oral hygiene is the fact that when they do brush, it might not be for a long enough period of time. Teens Health by the Nemours Foundation recommends that adolescents brush for two or three minutes; sometimes teens are lucky if they clock a meager 30 seconds. Therefore, using smartphone timer apps or even an egg timer can help teens become more aware of how long they should be brushing. Or, if your teen is never without his or her headphones, use a three-minute song as a guideline for brushing.
Limit Soda and Candy
Teens seem to be able to exist on a steady diet of soda, chips and candy, but those kinds of treats can wreak havoc on teeth. A diet high in sugar promotes bacteria and cavities. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 15 percent of children and teens between the ages of 6-19 have untreated cavities. By making healthier treats and drinks readily available, teens might be less likely to nosh on sugary foods. Keep bottled water, cut vegetables, whole-grain crackers and other sugar-free treats at the ready for convenient snacking.
Appeal to Confidence
Teens are notoriously concerned with their looks, so appealing to their image can be one way to encourage teens to brush up on their oral hygiene habits. Gently reminding teens that a slack dental care routine could result in yellow stains and bad breath can help remind them that the importance of toothbrushing is more than just staying cavity-free. If your teen is self-conscious about his or her smile, whitening toothpastes and mouthwashes can help improve confidence and contribute to a regular hygiene habit.
While teens might be perpetually time-crunched, skipping regular oral care to catch a few more minutes of sleep in the morning can have serious consequences. Making oral hygiene simple, quick and personalized may inspire your teen to brush regularly — and maybe even get to school on time.

To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 

Tuesday, 6 August 2019

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay: Causes & Prevention

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come. 

What Causes Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.
There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby. 
Tooth decay is a disease that can begin with cavity-causing bacteria being passed from the mother (or primary caregiver) to the infant. These bacteria are passed through the saliva. When the mother puts the baby’s feeding spoon in her mouth, or cleans a pacifier in her mouth, the bacteria can be passed to the baby. 
If your infant or toddler does not receive an adequate amount of fluoride, they may also have an increased risk for tooth decay. The good news is that decay is preventable. 

Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

  • Try not to share saliva with the baby through common use of feeding spoons or licking pacifiers. After each feeding, wipe your child’s gums with a clean, damp gauze pad or washcloth. 
  • When your child’s teeth come in, brush them gently with a child-size toothbrush and a smear (or grain of rice sized amount) of fluoride toothpaste until the age of 3. 
  • Brush the teeth with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste from the ages of 3 to 6.
  • Supervise brushing until your child can be counted on to spit and not swallow toothpaste—usually not before he or she is 6 or 7. 
  • Place only formula, milk or breast milk in bottles. Avoid filling the bottle with liquids such as sugar water, juice or soft drinks. 
  • Infants should finish their bedtime and nap time bottles before going to bed. 
  • If your child uses a pacifier, provide one that is clean—don’t dip it in sugar or honey. 
  • Encourage your child to drink from a cup by his/her first birthday. 
  • Encourage healthy eating habits. 

When your child’s first tooth appears, talk to your dentist about scheduling the first dental visit. Treat the first dental visit as you would a well-baby checkup with the child’s physician. Remember: starting early is the key to a lifetime of good dental health. For more information about nutrition and your baby, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org
Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 


Wednesday, 24 July 2019

Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 2 of 2)


symptoms 

When Do Baby Teeth Fall Out

Once all the baby teeth have fully come in, it is very important to keep up with twice daily brushing to keep them clean and strong. It is recommended that parents brush their kids' teeth until the age of eight. During that time, those new baby teeth will begin to wiggle and fall out.
Baby teeth usually begin falling out in order of appearance. The lower center teeth go first, followed by the top center pair, and so on. This usually starts happening by age six, but some kids can start losing teeth as early as age four. Most children get excited when they feel their teeth start to wiggle (and the Tooth Fairy’s inevitable visit is also a big help), while some kids worry that losing a tooth will hurt when it falls out. If your child is worried, you can reassure him or her that they probably won't feel anything. A baby tooth typically won’t loosen until the permanent tooth below begins pushing it up to take its place. But it is possible for kids to lose a baby tooth before the permanent tooth is ready to erupt.

The Emergence Of Permanent Teeth

Once permanent teeth start coming in, you may notice that these new teeth look bigger, and you are correct. Adult teeth are not only bigger, but they also tend to be less white than baby teeth and have pronounced ridges because they haven't been used yet for biting and chewing.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com 

Monday, 15 July 2019

Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 1 of 2)




Your child’s first set of teeth is as much of a milestone coming in as they are when they are wiggling loose. With the anticipation and anxiety associated with both events, it is understandable that parents want to know when to expect their baby’s first teeth to come in and when those baby teeth will fall out.

When Do Baby Teeth Come Inemerging teeth

So, how many baby teeth are there? There are 20 primary baby teeth that are already present in a child’s jaw at birth, and they usually start appearing – or erupting– between six months and one year. You can expect your child’s full set of teeth to come in by age three. You can also refer to a baby teeth chart for this. Just remember that every child is different, so no exact dates should be expected, but below is an approximate order of when you can expect baby teeth to come in:
  1. Lower center teeth (or lower center incisors) arrive between approximately six to ten months.
  2. Top center teeth (or top center incisors) arrive around eight to 12 months.
  3. Lateral incisors—just to the side of the center ones—come next between nine and 13 months.
  4. Canines between 16 and 23 months.
  5. Molars are next, with the first molars arriving between 13 to 19 months and the second molars arriving between 23 and 33 months./li>
When baby teeth begin pushing their way up through your baby’s gums, it can prove to be a very stressful time for both you and your child. Common baby teeth eruption symptoms are inflamed gums, excessive drooling, chewing on things, and irritability. It’s important to bear with your child during this time and maintain proper infant oral hygiene.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Ivan K. Salmons, DDS  
1855 Indian Hills Drive   
Sioux City, IA 51104   
(712) 239-5900   
SiouxCityDentist.com